Site seeing – March 06 – Bruce Petty’s Glendale Freight house Module Redux edition

In a post on January 18, 2017 I made mention of Bruce Petty’s excellent module of the end of the Union Pacific’s Glendale Branch and the freight station located there. Bruce’s Module is 5 feet (1500mm) x 18 inches (450mm) but to my eye looks much bigger because of the great use of the space he has made. There is no crowding, no feeling of busyness, only the feeling of a warm summers afternoon in Los Angeles sometime during the 1960s or 1970s. This small scene is evocative and places you immediately in the place and time, even if that is coloured by your chosen time period.

The majority of my layout designs fit into an 8 foot space Bruce’s layout module with the addition of a 3 foot fiddle yard fits right in the space available and would make an excellent display or exhibition layout. More importantly it would fit with any time period from the late 1940s – early 1950s (when I believe that the freight house was built) through to the mid to late 1980s when I believe the freight house fell out of use.

As I said in the previous post I’ve pondered over how to use Bruce’s track plan in other ways. I’ve even worked the design up into a 1/12th scale model to see how it might work. I’ll come back to the alternative in my next post; for now let’s revisit Bruce’s excellent module.

A closer look at Bruce’s module

While this module is a part of Bruce’s larger railroad forming the end of the UP’s Glendale branch it can also stand alone as a layout in its own right. At its heart it is an Inglenook layout. Each of the freight house roads can take two 40 foot boxcars against the dock. For those of you interested in modelling this layout at a later stage it is highly likely that the Freight station never hosted more than 2 x 50 foot boxcars at any one time. If it did so then they would be placed on the right most track with the second car either unloaded directly into trucks as shown in Photo 1 above or set off spot on the left most track and switched out once a suitable space was available at the dock. Lots of switching possibilities here.

Of particular note in the photo above is the connecting piece to the rest of the layout. I like this little yet important touch. The wooden insert which allows the module to join the layout has been disguised as a typical UP/SP bridge. Very smart and ensures that the layout and the module appear to be a single whole and not something that Bruce built later on.

Operation

Operations on this layout would be pretty good too. As we’ve discussed before on the blog Inglenooks are completely prototypical and often used by railroads in tight places. Operating with a locomotive pushing in – pulling out switching focuses on the industry or industries served. The longest track on Bruce’s layout I would use as my switching storage and sorting track. The incoming train pulling outbound cars before spotting them on the long track. Cars would then be switched according to requirement on the remaining two car tracks at the docks. Any cars from those pulled needing to be spotted back at the dock could then be spotted before the locomotive crew pick up the remaining outbound cars and head back across the bridge and back to the yard. And here endeth the session.

Short, clear, easy to achieve, enjoyable and within the 30 minutes to 1 hour per day play time that a small layout should give you. Whether you use a single person (driver/engineer only) or two person (driver/engineer and conductor) crew to do the work the time taken will remain roughly the same. I prefer a two person crew simply because it makes the play time more fun when family or friends get involved.

Hope that this revisit has been of some use. If you like the blog don’t forget to Like and Subscribe. PLease comment if you are looking for more information on layout designs or on the designs I’ve previously posted. And of course take the time to visit the “further reading and resources” links below.

Further Reading and Resources

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Posted in Class 1, HO Scale, Inglenook, Layout Design, Layouts, Operations, Prototype, Scales, Site seeing, Small, Switching, This Site, Web | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Site update – 20 February – BTM Tram #18 photos

Over November, December and early January I documented some updates to BTM Tram Number 18 as it goes through its rebuild.  The page has a lot of interesting images of the underframe, resistor grids and the motors. Of greater interest, to me at least, was the changing out of an armature. It’s not something I’ve ever seen done before so I thought I’d document it. Head over to #18’s page and view the evolving gallery there.

The armature being lifted out of the motor housing

The armature being lifted out of the motor housing

If you have any information to share please let me know and I’ll be happy to share it.

Andrew

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Site seeing – February 19 – The small passenger layout edition

While searching for ideas recently I came across a now very old set of posts from 2001 onwards about the building of a narrow yet long passenger station layout. Onto today’s site of interest.

Site 1: Simon Martin’s Shelf Layout project

This appears to be an orphaned site, and I cannot find any information or updates beyond the 2005 update on the page. Which is a real shame as this layout is a simple, well designed and yet highly operational layout for the single operator at home or at an exhibition.

The track plan is clean and has no major needs apart from two switches and some flextrack. You could even use this to get into building your own track work. Operationally there is much to work with. Trains may arrive and depart from either platform. Heading to the fueling depot means that you need to either shunt back onto the main, then into the second platform road prior to running back into the fueling/storage road. Planning your moves here would be very worthwhile in the smooth operation of the layout.

The fueling/storage point on the bottom left of the plan gives options for storing stock on the layout without over crowding the scene. Scenically the station building hides the end of the platform roads and gives the layout a greater depth than would otherwise be the case.

I think this would be a great design to work with not only in the short-term, but for the longer term by adding all the bells and whistles (such as automated announcements, details, more scenery and upgraded ready to run models.

I’ve tried finding anything else by the blogger but have been unsuccessful. I’d love to see more of this layout and what it became. No luck however. So we’ll just have to enjoy the layout as it would have been. If you know anything about the layout, the author or have contact details for Simon, let me know in the comments.

Posted in Exhibition, Layout Design, Layouts, Liked off site, Modelling, Operations, Site seeing, Sites of interest, Small, Switching, Tuning Fork, Web | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Site seeing – February 17 – Alain Kap’s excellent exhibition layout blog

I’ve not met or talked with Alain before. But his small layout popped up on one of my regular reads, Carl Arendt’s Micro/Small layouts site, when notification went out about a page update this week. But we’ll get to all of this shortly. For now on with the site seeing.

Site 1: Alain Kap’s Exhibition Layout

The link above takes you to the Alain’s blog with a search set for his Show Layout posts. There are five articles included so far, each of which shows something new and to me interesting. The board design and build are my favourite so far. As this gives me something to think about for diorama style layouts in the future.

The layout, based on Shortliner Jack’s Box Street layout, is well worth the look as Alain takes you through the baseboard build and then through track laying and building creation. Looking forward to more of this coming in the near future. There is way more great modelling there too, and not just railways.

Site 2: Carendt.com – February update

There are four layouts featured in this update:

  1. R.I.P. Car Shop – by Alain KAP in HO standard gauge
  2. Ingly Nook – by Scott Pollard in 009 narrow gauge
  3. Piper’s Yard – by Andrew Cockburn in OO standard gauge, and
  4. Bridge Street – by David Collett also in OO standard gauge

All of which meet the criteria for small and friendly little layouts, they also are well done visually and technically. Very well worth looking at all the pictures provided in the post.

I do hope you enjoy this post. If you do, or don’t, let me know in the comments.

Posted in Layout Design, Layouts, Modelling, Operations, Site seeing, Sites of interest, Small, Switching, Web | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Site seeing – February 16 – The traction faction edition

Having grown up in a city with electric railways there is always that part of me as a modeller wanting to recreate what I remember as a kid. Watching the sparks pull away from the station and hearing the sounds of the motors change as they reached the limit of adhesion, especially on a wet day, can make me a very happy-chappy when I hear them. You can read more about the history of Sydney’s electric trains at the operator’s site “Sydney Trains“. Being an avid reader of technical stuff when I find really useful information about modelling overhead and trams, trains and trolleys I like to share. Thus onto todays site seeing journey.

Site 1: The East Penn Traction Club

This is not the only useful page on the site, it is however among the most giving pages on the site with a large range of downloads available on all areas of overhead modelling. A large proportion of you are US-based and for those interested directly in modelling trolley systems this is a treasure trove. For the rest of us a large range of highly useful documents on improving HO model performance, modelling tips and articles and a set of standards that certainly could be adapted to your need without major change can be downloaded.

Site 2: Rowntree Sidings in Detail

Image courtesy Blyth and District Model Railway Society

 

In the mood of traction action today we come to Rowntree Sidings. Based in the Tyne and Wear district in England the model features a working representation of the Tyne and Wear Metro system.

The linked page discusses in detail the design and creation of the model. Although sadly there is no track plan which would have helped understand the text quite a lot. There are lots of videos available on YouTube however that give a reasonable idea on the model.

There is also, on our favourite video site, a lot of driver’s eye view videos of the Tyne and Wear Metro that are well worth the watch. Especially if you enjoy cab rides.

I hope you get some use out of today’s sites. Leave a comment if you find them of use or have some other places of interest you’d like to share.

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Site seeing – February 13 – The Clamp it edition

Despite what you might be thinking (for those of us old enough to remember this television show) this is not about the family made rich through an accident during hunting for dinner. This post is about creative solutions shared on one of my favourite sites when building to a hard right angle. So despite wanting to tell you a story about a man named Jed it’s time to launch into today’s site seeing adventure.

Site 1: Model Railroad Hobbyist – Clamps for assembling structures

I have thought for some time about buying a right-clamp for assisting building my structures. Especially so since I do a lot of scratchbuilding. When I saw this pop up on my email feed from MRH I just had to share some of the ideas here.

My favourite one (since I have most of these available now) is this creative use of Lego:

Image courtesy of MRH Forums

Head on over to the post and see some of the other great ideas presented there. I have to say though that this one really ticked all the boxes for me.

Posted in Information, Modelling, Site seeing, Sites of interest, Tools, Web | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Site seeing – February 11 – The load of scrap edition

Update and explanation

There has been  a shortage of posts on Andrew’s Trains during February, due to a couple of factors. First and most importantly my eldest is moving to another city and beginning at University. Mum and I have put in a lot of work to get her ready for the transition during January and so far in February. This has included multiple trips back and forth looking for accommodation, signing of leases, paying rent, bond and the government related tasks that need to be done to get your adult life underway. The second reason in my output has been extreme heat events we’ve suffered in regional Victoria over the last couple of weeks. Most homes in town don’t have air conditioning. Ballarat’s climate (being nearly 1500 feet above sea level with usually low humidity) means that apart from a few days each year we don’t need it. However, when the air temperature gets over 35 degrees Celsius (this week over the 40 degree Celsius mark) there is simply nowhere to hide from the heat. February is Victoria’s hottest month and the most dangerous. Enough of all of that for now – on to the modelling.

Site 1: The Design Build Op Blog – Scrap Steel Loads

Image courtesy of designbuildop.hansmanns.org

Mike Weiss, one of the Wheeling Freight Terminal crew members has a very clever method of creating scrap steel loads for gondolas. His approach takes on industry standards, rather than the usual articles in model railroad magazines about making scrap steel loads. Often these articles don’t provide an easy way to remove the loads without a wire loop or hidden magnet. In this article Mike addresses both issues. There is a lot of great information on the blog beyond this post. Take the time to look around. Very well worth the effort.

Posted in Gondola, Loads, Modelling, Site seeing, Sites of interest, Weathering, Web | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

2017 Corio Model Railway Club show report (28-29 January)

The city of Geelong (of which Corio is a suburb) is just over 90 kilometres away from home, that’s around an hours travelling time each way in the car. I may be getting fussy in my old age. I find myself considering the costs of getting to and entering shows versus the enjoyment gained as a criteria for attendance. The Corio Club’s show is still one of the best large non-metropolitan Melbourne shows going, although I find that my fascination with the ‘BIG’ exhibition layouts diminishing, and the desire to find and watch small layouts is growing rapidly. Don’t mistake that I am only interested in small layouts. What I want to see at exhibitions are more layouts by individuals, for individuals. That is people who’ve built a layout, who can show others how to build a layout for themselves. The large club layouts are fantastic to me but I know that they are beyond my personal reach, and I am sure that when the punters who come through the door so full of enthusiasm get home, take a long hard look at the price of trains, track, baseboard, effort, blah, blah, and blah are left with a hollow feeling. That is the feeling of not being able to achieve. I’m hoping to reverse that trend with my own small layouts this year. More on those for later posts; during the meanwhilst let’s on to the exhibition report.

Exhibition report

The 44th MR Exhibition was very well attended. So well attended in fact that it was very warm inside the location and packed to the gills. Moving around was difficult to achieve, photography even more so. The site this year was larger than in previous years, moving from Geelong West out to Belmont, near Deakin University’s Waurn Ponds campus. It appeared easy to get to by public transport and by car. Well supported by the local and national vendors including Broad Gauge Models, Outback Model Company, SDS Models, Kerroby Models, Train World Pty Ltd, Road and Rail Hobbies, and many more. This year there did seem to be more vendors than exhibitors though. I understand that you need vendor support, yet I felt crowded in by vendors and struggled to see enough layouts.

One brighter note was the layout bought by, and showcasing the models of, Phoenix Models and Hobbies. Not only the best layout at the show (small of course), even though it was not listed in the program. I was impressed by the central idea which dovetails nicely with other layout ideas I’ve been working on for some time. Now let’s get into the images.

Image Galleries

There were several layouts of note. Some I’ve shown on the blog before, others new.

Yendys

The first is Yendys from the ACT Model Society. A large layout imagining a section of the leafy outskirts of the Sydney are. As a Sydney boy born and bred it reminds me most of the main western line between Stanmore and Ashfield. It could just as well be the Bankstown line between Sydenham and Hurlstone Park. If you’ve ever spent any time in Sydney’s inner city by the railway you can smell the brake dust and diesel fumes the moment you see this layout.

Alexandra

This HO scale layout displays the area around Alexandra in Melbourne’s north-east as it was in 1947, prior to the closure of the timber tramway. The track plan is the original Victorian Railways (VR) track plan. Buildings are scratchbuilt from photos with the Broad Gauge (5’3″) VR line coming in from the left side of the layout and the narrow gauge tramway coming in from the right. Each has its own fiddle yard. You can read more about the tramway by visiting the museum’s website. If you look closely you’ll see on the model the green Kelly & Lewis 0-6-0DM of 1935 in the images.

Phoenix Models and Hobby display layout

This layout was the standout of all layouts at the show. Yet it was not in the Exhibitors program. I hope they’ll bring it to many more shows in the future. There’ll be more on this layout and it’s features in another post soon.

Thanks for stopping by. I hope that you enjoyed the layout tours. This is not all of them mind you but the standout ones I wanted to share.

 

Posted in About, Exhibition, Layouts, Reports | Tagged , , , , , | 11 Comments

Site seeing – January 30 – The PowerPoint and PDF edition

Edward Traxler is someone I’ve read about for a while. Only recently did I visit his website. Where I found today’s interesting set of resources.

Site 1: Edward Traxler’s The Deep River Railroad – PDFs and PPTs page

It’s just what the name says folks. A few really good clinic presentations and PDF files for building all sorts of interesting things. Plans for loading ramps, piers, and links to other resources for the interested.

Site 2 – as for site 1 – Building cardstock models the modern way

Also on Edwards site is a great tutorial on building using cardstock (thicker grades of paper). Both a PDF and PPT file are available for download and there is an overview on the page in the link above also.

Posted in Downloads, Information, Layouts, Modelling, Site seeing, Sites of interest, Web | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Site seeing – January 27 – The ‘times they are a changing’ edition

I received an email from Shawn Branstetter earlier this week announcing that his site http://shortlinemodelers.com/ would be closing down very shortly. I was, to say the least devastated. Shawn’s site is a treasure trove of useful articles and ideas.

I contacted Shawn for comment and post it here in its entirety: “Unfortunately it is true Andrew. I’m not exactly sure what I’m going to do with the content however, the Facebook page will remain active. Whiteriver Productions has expressed interest in hosting the content and I don’t want the name to go away I just don’t have time to be a developer, writer, very poor editor and illustrator by myself and find time to build. It’s just too much. Somehow I will make sure all content is available to everyone. As soon as I figure that out, I’ll let you know.”

Site 1: Get it before it is gone – Shortline Modelers

Go see it and grab anything you can now. Not sure how long this will remain available or where it may move to. Check out his cement modelling articles – they are outstanding.

Site 2: Shortline Modelers on Facebook

Head on over to the Facebook page and follow him there if you have a Facebook account. This will keep you in touch with Shawn for the future.

Posted in About, Site seeing, Site Updates, Sites of interest, This Site, Web, YouTube | Tagged , , | Leave a comment